A blupete Essay


Hazlitt's Work, A List:

For us, William Hazlitt is the most distinguish English essayist. Following is a list of the contents of each of the books I possess on Hazlitt.

(LEGEND: ** = a blupete favourite.)

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#1 The Eloquence of the British Senate (1808)
§ Murray published The Eloquence of the British Senate in 1808. It was described as, "Best Speeches of the Most Distinguished English, Irish, and Scotch Parliamentary Speakers, From the Beginning of the Reign of Charles I to the Present Time." The speeches were presumably selected by Hazlitt; the book, consisting of two volumes, went into a second edition. "Some of the notes, such as the character of Burke in Vol. II, are in his best style, and lend a special interest to the volumes which they would otherwise not possess." -- Keynes. The first issue was published under Thomas Ostell's imprint, and dated 1807. The sheets were transferred to John Murray, and even had a third incarnation, dated 1812, under the imprint of Cradock and Joy. In 1808, in addition to that of Murray's, the book was published by A. Constable and Co., in Edinburgh. In America, I see from the listings (ABE) where the work was brought out by Thomas Kirk (Brooklyn, NY) in 1809 & in 1810; and by Prior And Dunning (New York), in 1810.

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#2 Round Table (1815-17)
§ Originally the Round Table, a collection of essays having been published in the Examiner [edited by Leigh Hunt] were written by a variety of people, quite a few by Hunt; the original, consisting of two volumes came out in 1817, my volume of the Round Table contains only those essays written by Hazlitt, the editors having considered the rest to be "both inferior and dissimilar to him.") (London: Sampson Low, Son, & Marston, 1869).
  1. Introductory Note by the editor.
  2. On the Love of Life (Jan.,1815) (Also appears in #14.)
  3. On Classical Education
  4. On the Tatler
  5. On Modern Comedy (Also appears in #19.)
  6. On Posthumous Fame
  7. On Hogarth's Marriage á-la-Mode
  8. On the Grand and Familiar Style of Painting (Also appears in #3.)
  9. The Subject continued
  10. On Milton's Versification
  11. On Manner
  12. On the Tendency of Sects
  13. On the Causes of Methodism
  14. On the Midsummer Night's Dream (Also appears in #5.)
  15. On the Beggar's Opera
  16. On Patriotism. -- A Fragment
  17. On Beauty
  18. On Imitation
  19. On Gusto (May,1816) (Also appears in #14 & #15.)
  20. On Pedantry
  21. The Same Subject continued
  22. On the Character of Rousseau
  23. On Different Sorts of Fame
  24. Character of John Bull
  25. On Good Nature
  26. On the Character of Milton's Eve
  27. Observations on Mr. Wordsworth's poem, "The Excursion"
  28. The Same Subject continued
  29. A Day by the Fire
  30. The Subject continued
  31. The Subject continued
  32. On Religious Hypocrisy
  33. On the Literary Character
  34. On Common-place Critics (Nov.,1816)
  35. On Actors and Acting (Jan.,1817)

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#3 Lectures on the English Poets (1815-17):
§ (1818); (Oxford University Press, 1933).
Lecture I
  • Intro. -- On Poetry in General (Also appears in #19.)
    Lecture II
  • On Chaucer and Spenser
    Lecture III
  • On Shakespeare and Milton (Also appears in #18 & #19.)
    Lecture IV
  • On Dryden and Pope
    Lecture V
  • On Thompson and Cowper
    Lecture VI
  • On Swift, Young, Gray, Collins, etc.
    Lecture VII
  • On Burns, and the Old English Ballads
    Lecture VIII
  • On The Living Poets
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    #4 Lectures on the English Comic Writers (1819), and
    Miscellaneous Essays
    ("Fugitive Writings):
    § This work is a collection of Hazlitt's contributions to the "New Monthly" and to the "Monthly" magazines." My edition (London: Dent, Everyman's Lib., 1913) has an introduction by W.E.Henley (3 pages) and a list of published works.
    Lectures:
    I. Intro. - On Wit and Humour (1818)
    II. On Shakespeare and Ben Jonson
    III. On Cowley, Butler, Suckling, Etherege, etc.
    IV. On Wycherley, Congreve, Vanbrugh, and Farquhar
    V. On the Periodical Essayists
    VI. On English Novelists
    VII. On the works of Hogarth. On the Grand and Familiar Style of Painting
    VIII. On the Comic Writers of the Last Century
    Misc. Essays:
    (1) The Fight** (One of Hazlitt's most celebrated essays, it first appeared in the New Monthly Magazine, February, 1822. The "Joe" to whom Hazlitt refers to in this essay, according to Birrell, is Joseph Parkes, a solicitor. This essay, "The Fight," also appears in #14, #15, #18, & #19.)
    (2) Merry England (Also appears in #13, #15, #17 & #18)
    (3) Of Persons One Would Wish To Have Seen (Jan.,1826) (Also appears in #12, #17, & #18.)
    (4) On a Sun-dial (Oct.,1827) (Also appears in #13, #14, #15, #17, & #18.)
    (5) Why the Heroes of Romance are Insipid (Also appears in #13.)
    (6) The Shyness of Scholars
    (7) The Main Chance (Also appears in #19.)
    (8) Self Love and Benevolence (Also appears in #13 & #19.)
    (9) The Same Subject Continued
    (10 The Free Admission Written in 1830, during his last days.
    (11) The Sick Chamber Also, written in 1830, during his last days.
    (12) Footmen (Also appears in #13.)
    (13) On the Want of Money** (Jan.,1827) (Also appears in #14.)
    (14) On the Feeling of Immortality in Youth** (Mar.1827) (Also appears in #12, #14, & #17.)
    (15) On Reading Old Books
    (16) On Disagreeable People** (Aug.,1827) (Also appears in #13, #14, & #17.)

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    #5 Political Essays (1819):
    § (Oxford: Woodstock, 1990).
    1. Preface**
    2. The Marquis Wellesley
    3. Mr. Southey, Poet Laureat
    4. Mr. Southey's New Year Ode
    5. Dottrel-catching
    6. The Bourbons and Buonaparte
    7. Vetus
    8. On the Courier and Times Newspapers
    9. Illustrations of Vetus
    10. On the Late War
    11. Prince Maurice's Parrot
    12. Whether the Friends of Freedom can Entertain any sanguine hopes of the Favorable Results of the ensuing Congress
    13. The Lay of the Laureate
    14. Mr. Owen's "New View of Society," &c.**
    15. Speeches of Charles C. Western, Esq. M. P. and Henry Brougham, Esq. M.P.**
    16. Mr. Coleridge Lay Sermon
    17. ----- Statesman's Manual
    18. ----- Lay Serman
    19. Buonaparte and Muller
    20. Illustrations of 'The Times' Newspaper
    21. Mr. Macirone's "Interesting Facts relating to the Fall and Death of
    22. Joachim Murat, King of Naples."
    23. Wat Tyler and the Quarterly Review
    24. The Courier and Wat Tyler
    25. Mr. Southey's Letter to William Smith, Esq.
    26. On the Spy-System
    27. On the same subject
    28. On the Treatment of the State Prisoners
    29. The Opposition and the Courier
    30. England in 1798, by S. T. Coleridge
    31. On the Effects of War and Taxes
    32. Character of Mr. Burke
    33. On Court Influence
    34. On the Clerical Character (Jan.-Feb.,1818)
    35. What is the People?
    36. On the Regal Character
    37. "Fudge Family in Paris"
    38. Character of Lord Chatham
    39. Character of Burke
    40. Character of Fox
    41. Character of Pitt
    42. "Pitt and Buonaparte"
    43. An Examination of Mr. Malthus's Doctrines
    44. On the Originality of Mr. Malthus's Essay
    45. On the Principles of Population as affecting the Schemes of Utopian Improvement
    46. On the Application of Mr. Malthus's Principle to the Poor Laws
    47. Queries relating to the Essay on Population

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    #6 Lectures on the Literature of the Age of Elizabeth (1820) / Characters of Shakespear's Plays (1817):
    § in one volume (London: Bell, Bohn's; 1909).
    Lectures:
    I. Intro.
    II. On Lyly, Marlowe, Heywood, Middleton, and Rowley
    III. On Marston, Chapman, Decker, and Webster
    IV. On Beaumont and Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Ford and Massinger
    V. On single Plays, Poems, etc.
    VI. On Misc. Poems; Beaumont, Fletcher, Drayton, Daniel, etc.; Sir P. Sidney
    VII. Character of Bacon's Works - Compared as to the style with Sir. Thomas Browne and Jeremy Taylor
    VIII. On the Spirit of Ancient and Modern Literature - German Drama contrasted
    Characters of Shakespear's Plays:
    1. Preface
    2. Cymbeline
    3. Macbeth (Also appears in #18 & #19.)
    4. Julius Caesar
    5. Othello
    6. Timon of Athens
    7. Coriolanus (Also appears in #19.)
    8. Troilus and Chressida
    9. Anthony and Cleopatra
    10. Hamlet (Also appears in #18.)
    11. The Tempest
    12. A Midsummer Night's Dream
    13. Romeo and Juliet
    14. Lear
    15. Richard II.
    16. Henry IV., Part I. and II. (Also appears in #18.)
    17. Henry V.
    18. Henry VI., in Three Plays
    19. Richard III.
    20. Henry VIII.
    21. King John
    22. Twelfth Night; or What You Will
    23. The Two Gentlemen of Verona
    24. The Merchant of Venice
    25. The Winter's Tale
    26. All's well that Ends Well
    27. Love's Labour's Lost
    28. Much Ado About Nothing
    29. As You Like It
    30. The Taming of the Shrew
    31. Measure for Measure
    32. The Merry Wives of Windsor
    33. The comedy of Errors
    34. Doubtful Plays of Shakespear
    35. Poems and Sonnets

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    #7 Table Talk, Essays on Men and Manners** (1822),
    § (London: Bell, Bohn's; 1910).
    1. On The Pleasure of Painting (Dec.,1820)
    2. On the Past and Future
    3. On Genius and Common Sense**
    4. On the Character of Cobbett (1821)
    5. On People with One Idea
    6. On the Ignorance of the Learned (Jul.,1818)
    7. On the Indian Jugglers
    8. On Living to One's Self** (Jan.,1821)
    9. On Thought and Action
    10. On Will Making
    11. On Certain Inconsistencies in Sir Joshua Reynold's Discourses
    12. On Paradox and Common-Place
    13. On Vulgarity and Affectation
    14. On Landscape of Nicholas Poussin
    15. On Milton's Sonnets
    16. On Going on a Journey (Jan.,1822)
    17. On Coffee-House Politicians
    18. On the Aristocracy of Letters
    19. On Criticism
    20. On Great and Little Things (Feb.,1822)
    21. On Familiar Style (1821)
    22. On Effeminacy of Character
    23. Why Distant Objects Please (1822)
    24. On Corporate Bodies
    25. Whether Actors Ought to Sit in the Boxes
    26. On the Disadvantages of Intellectual Superiority
    27. On Patronage and Puffing
    28. On the Knowledge of Character (1822)
    29. On the Picturesque and Ideal
    30. On the Fear of Death** (1822)

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    #8 Liber Amoris (1823):
    § (London: The Hogarth Press, 1985); Contemporary Intro. (6 pages) by Michael Neve, 1893 Intro. (47 pages) by Richard Le Gallienne; Appendices; Publisher's Note, dealing with the "composition and publication history of the book." This, in my opinion, is not a great work; I think Hazlitt was love sick at the time. See a short extract from this work, Unaltered Love & Perfect Love

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    #9 The Spirit of the Age** (1825):
    § (Oxford University Press, 1970). This, Birrell thinks, is Hazlitt's "best book."
    1. Jeremy Bentham**
    2. William Godwin**
    3. Mr. Coleridge**
    4. Rev. Mr. Irving
    5. Mr. Horne Tooke
    6. Sir Walter Scott
    7. Lord Byron**
    8. Mr. Southey**
    9. Mr. Wordsworth
    10. Sir James MacKintosh
    11. Mr. Malthus
    12. The Right Hon. George Canning
    13. Mr. Gifford
    14. Mr. Jeffrey**
    15. Mr. Brougham - Sir F. Burdett**
    16. Lord Eldon and Mr. Wilberforce
    17. Mr. Cobbett**
    18. Mr. Campbell and Mr. Crabbe
    19. Mr. T. Moore - Mr. Leigh Hunt
    20. Elia, and Geoffrey Craydon**

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    #10 Notes of a Journey through France and Italy (1824):
    § (London: Hunt & Clarke, 1826).
    Contents:
    Chapter I
    Brighton, the Channel, Dieppe, etc.
    Chapter II
  • Normany, Rouen, etc.
    Chapter III
  • Lord Byron, Mr. Moore, etc.
    Chapter IV
  • The Louvre.
    Chapter V
  • The Theatre, etc.
    Chapter VI
  • Modern French Pictures.
    Chapter VII
  • The Luxembourg Gallery.
    Chapter VIII
  • Cemetery of Pére la Chaise, etc.
    Chapter IX
  • French actors, etc.
    Chapter X
  • Description of Paris, etc.
    Chapter XI
  • French Sculpture. Note on the Elgin Marbles.
    Chapter XII
  • Opera, etc.
    Chapter XIII
  • On the Road to Lyons, French Girls, French Translation of Tom Jones, etc.
    Chapter XIV
  • Set out for Turin by Way of Mont Cenis, First view of the Alps, Chambery, Susa, etc.
    Chapter XV
  • Turin, Italian Peasants, Parma, Bologna, etc.
    Chapter XVI
  • Florence, etc.
    Chapter XVII
  • Benvenuto Cellini, etc.
    Chapter XVIII
  • San Lorenzo, Lake of Bolsena, etc.
    Chapter XIX
  • Rome, etc.
    Chapter XX
  • Character of the English, etc.
    Chapter XXI
  • Italian Banditti, Tivoli, etc.
    Chapters XXII & XXIII
  • Venice, etc.
    Chapter XXIV
  • Milan, Verona, etc.
    Chapter XXV
  • The passage over the Simplon, etc.
    Chapter XXVI
  • Geneva, Lausanne, etc.
    Chapter XXVII
  • Down the Rhine through Holland, etc.
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    #11 The Plain Speaker (1826):
    § Notes by A. R. Waller & Arnold Glover, intro. (3 pages) by P. P. Howe, list of published works. (London: Dent, Everyman's Lib., 1928.)
    I. On the Prose Style of Poets (Aug.,1822)
    II. On Dreams
    III. On the Conversations of Authors (Sep.,1820) (Also appears in #14, #15 & #18.)
    IV. The Same Subject Continued
    V. On Reason and Imagination
    VI. On Application to Study
    VII. On Londoners and country People
    VIII. On the Spirit of Obligations (Jan.,1824)
    IX. On the Old Age of Artists
    X. On Envy (A Dialogue) < See also #(13)>
    XI. On Sitting for one's Picture (Nov.,1823)
    XII. Whether Genius is conscious of its Powers? (Jun.,1823)
    XIII. On the Pleasure of Hating (1826)
    XIV. On Dr. Spurzheim's Theory
    XV. On Egotism
    XVI. Hot and Cold (1826)
    XVII. The New School of Reform (A Dialogue between a Rationalist and a sentimentalist)
    XVIII. On the Qualifications Necessary to Success in Life**
    XIX. On the Look of a Gentleman
    XX. On Reading Old Books (Feb.,1821) (Also appears in #18.)
    XXI. On Personal Character (Mar.,1821)
    XXII. On People of Sense
    XXIII. On Antiquity
    XXIV. On the Difference between Writing and Speaking (1825)
    XXV. On a Portrait of an English Lady, by Vandyke
    XXVI. On Novelty and Familiarity
    XXVII. On Old English Writers and Speakers (Jan.,1825)
    XXVIII. Madame Pasta and Mademoiselle Mars
    XXIX. Sir Walter Scott, Racine, and Shakespear
    XXX. On Depth and Superficiality (1826)
    XXXI. On Respectable People
    XXXII. On Jealousy and Spleen of Party

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    #12 Life of Napoleon (1828-30):
    § This work of Hazlitt's, the only major work (he was an essayist) "has not endured.") (London: Effingham Wilson & Chapman and Hall, four vols, 1830.) [Side note: Some saw Napoleon, as I dare say Hazlitt did, as "the mighty missionary of liberalism, the destroyer of serfdom, the enemy of legitimacy, the man who made hereditary princelings tremble..." (Bertrand Russell.)

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    #13 Winterslow, Essays and Characters Written There:
    § A selection likely made by Hazlitt's son, William with a two page introduction by him. (Oxford University Press, 1906.)
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827) (Also appears in #15, #17, #18 & #19.)
    II. Of Persons One Would Wish To Have Seen (see #(3))
    III. On the Party Spirit
    IV. On the Feeling of Immortality in Youth** (see #(3)) (Mar.1827)
    V. On Public Opinion (1830) (Also appears in #19.)
    VI. On Personal Identity (Also appears in #19.)
    VII. Mind and Motive (Also appears in #19.)
    VIII. On Means and Ends
    IX. Matter and Manner
    X. On Consistency of Opinion (Also appears in #19.)
    XI. Project for a New Theory of Civil and Criminal Legislation**
    XII. On the Character of Burke (#(4))
    XIII. On the Character of Fox (#(4))
    XIV. On the Character of Mr. Pitt (#(4))
    XV. On the Character of Lord Chatham (#(4))
    XVI. Belief, Whether Voluntary?
    XVII. A Farewell to Essay-writing (Mar.,1828) (Also appears in #14 #15.)

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    #14 Sketches and Essays:
    § (London: Richards, 1903).
    1. On Reading New Books
    2. On Cant and Hypocrisy** (Also appears in #14)
    3. Merry England (Also appears in #3.)
    4. On a Sun-dial (Also appears in #3.)
    5. On Prejudice**
    6. Self Love and Benevolence (Also appears in #3.)
    7. On Disagreeable People (Also appears in #3.)
    8. On Knowledge of the World
    9. On Fashion (Also appears in #19.)
    10. On Nicknames
    11. On Taste (Also appears in #16.)
    12. Why Heroes of Romance are Insipid (Also appears in #3.)
    13. On the Conversation of Lords
    14. The Letter Bell (Also appears in #14 & #18.)
    15. On Envy (Also appears in #10.)
    16. On the Spirit of Partisanship
    17. Footmen (Also appears in #3.)
    18. A Chapter on Editors

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    #15 Selected Essays of William Hazlitt:
    § Geoffrey Keynes, Ed.; (London: Nonsuch Press, 1930).
    From The Round Table #(1)
  • On the Love of the Country (Nov.,1814) (not in my Round Table?)
  • On the Love of Life (Jan.,1815)
  • On Common-place Critics (Nov.,1816)
  • Why the Arts are not progressive: A Fragment (Jan.,1814) (Not in my Round Table?) (Also appears in #19.)
  • On Gusto (May,1816)
  • On Actors and Acting (Jan.,1817)
    From Table Talk #(6):
    1. On The Pleasure of Painting (Dec.,1820)
    4. On the Character of Cobbett (1821)
    6. On the Ignorance of the Learned (Jul.,1818)
    8. On Living to One's Self** (Jan.,1821)
    16. On Going on a Journey (Jan.,1822)
    20. On Great and Little Things** (Feb.,1822)
    21. On Familiar Style (1821)
    23. Why Distant Objects Please (1822)
    28. On the Knowledge of Character (1822)
    30. On the Fear of Death** (1822)
    From The Plain Speaker # (10):
    I. On the Prose Style of Poets (Aug.,1822)
    III. On the Conversations of Authors (Sep.,1820)
    VIII. On the Spirit of Obligations (Jan.,1824)
    XI. On Sitting for one's Picture (Nov.,1823)
    XII. Whether Genius is conscious of its Powers? (Jun.,1823)
    XIII. On the Pleasure of Hating (1826)
    XVI. Hot and Cold (1826)
    XX. On Reading Old Books (Feb.,1821)
    XXI. On Personal Character (Mar.,1821)
    XXIV. On the Difference between Writing and Speaking (1825)
    XXVII.On Old English Writers and Speakers (Jan.,1825)
    XXX. On Depth and Superficiality (1826)
    See Essays in back of Eng Comic Writers # (3):
    I. Intro. - On Wit and Humour (1818)
    (1) The Fight**
    (3) Of Persons One Would Wish To Have Seen (Jan.,1826)
    (4) On a Sun-dial (Oct.,1827)
    (13)On the Want of Money** (Jan.,1827)
    (14)On the Feeling of Immortality in Youth** (Mar.1827)
    (16)On Disagreeable People** (Aug.,1827)
    From Literary Remains:
  • On the Conduct of Life** (1822)
  • On the Spirit of Monarchy** (Jan.,1823)
    Characteristics:
  • Characteristics (1823) (Also appears in #15, #16 & #19.)
  • Principal Picture Galleries in England:
  • Oxford (Nov.,1823)
  • The Dulwich Gallery (Jan.,1823)
  • Notes of a Journey through France and Italy: #(9)
  • The Entrance into Italy (Apr.,1825)
  • The Englishman (1826)
  • Sketches and Essays:
  • The Letter Bell (Mar.,1831)
  • On Cant and Hypocrisy** (Dec.,1828)
  • Life of Napoleon #(11):
  • The French Revolution (1828)
  • The Death of the Emperor Napoleon (1830)
  • Lectures on the English Poets #(2):
  • On Poetry in General (1818)
  • Coleridge (1818)
    From Winterslow #(12):
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827)
    V. On Public Opinion (1830)
    XVII. A Farewell To Essay-Writing (Mar.,1828)
    Lectures on the Literature Eliz. #(5):
  • Disappointment (1820)
  • View of the English Stage:
  • Mrs. Siddons (Jun.,1816)
    Eloquence of the British Senate:
  • Edmund Burke (1807)
  • The Spirit of the Age (#9):
  • Mr. Coleridge** (1825)
  • Mr. Wordsworth (1825)
  • Mr. Gifford (1825)
  • Elia, and Geoffrey Crayon (1825)
    Political Essays #(4):
  • On the Clerical Character (Jan.-Feb.,1818)
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    #16 The Best of Hazlitt:
    § P. P. Howe, Ed.; (London: Methuen, 1947).
    From Winterslow #(12):
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827)
    XVII. A Farewell To Essay-Writing (Mar.,1828)
    From Table Talk #(6):
    1. On The Pleasure of Painting (Dec.,1820)
    4. On the Character of Cobbett (1821)
    6. On the Ignorance of the Learned (Jul.,1818)
    7. On the Indian Jugglers
    16. On Going on a Journey (Jan.,1822)
    21. On Familiar Style (1821)
    From The Plain Speaker #(10):
    III. On the Conversations of Authors (Sep.,1820)
    IV. The Same Subject Continued
    (1) The Fight**
    (2) Merry England
    (4) On a Sun-dial (Oct.,1827)
    From Which Work ????:
    Conversations as Good as Real
    Characteristics:
    Characteristics (1823)

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    #17 New Writings by William Hazlitt:
    § Selected and edited by the noted expert on Hazlitt, P. P. Howe, this book contains essays either over looked or not previously discovered written between the years 1828-30. "The reader who may be new to Hazlitt will bear in mind that what is here offered are merely the crumbs from the rich man's table.") (London: Martin Secker, 1925).
      Travelling Abroad (23)
    1. The Influence of Books on the Progress of Manners
    2. The Prose Album
    3. The Modern Gradus ad Parnassum
    4. Mr. Landor's 'Imaginary Conversations'
    5. Grave Imposture
    6. A Stuffed Man
    7. Brummelliana (Also appears in #19.)
    8. Mr. Cobbett and the Quakers
    9. Mr. Jeffrey and Mr. Owen
    10. The First Meeting Between Fox and Grattan
    11. The Late Murders
    12. The Ruling Passion
    13. Pope Benedict
    14. Butts of Different Sorts
    15. Burke and the Edinburgh Phrenologists
    16. Phrenological Fallacies
    17. The Champions of Phrenology
    18. Common Fame
    19. Lord North
    20. Old Cloaks
    21. Coquets
    22. The Waverley Notes
    23. Mr. Jeffrey's Resignation of the Editorship of the 'Edinburgh Review'
    24. Autographs
    25. English Characteristics (Also appears in #19.)
    26. The Utilitarian Controversy
    27. The Laureate
    28. The Exclusionists in Taste
    29. Covent Garden Theatre
    30. Our National Theatres (Also appears in #19.)
    31. A Newspaper Sketch
    32. Notes and Index

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    #18 Hazlitt's Essays:
    § Introduction by Herbert Paul (London: Cassell, nd).
    From Winterslow (#12):
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827)
    From Essays in back of Eng Comic Writers (#3):
    (2) Merry England
    (3) Of Persons One Would Wish To Have Seen (Jan.,1826)
    (4) On a Sun-dial (Oct.,1827)
    (14) On the Feeling of Immortality in Youth** (Mar.1827)
    (16) On Disagreeable People** (Aug.,1827)
    From Table Talk (6):
    7. On the Indian Jugglers
    8. On Living to One's Self** (Jan.,1821)
    16. On Going on a Journey (Jan.,1822)
    23. Why Distant Objects Please (1822)

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    #19 Essays & Characters (1817):
    § Stanley Williams, Ed.; (London: Nelson, nd).
    From The Round Table (#1):
  • On Actors and Acting, Parts I & II (Jan.,1817)
  • Lectures on the English Poets (#2):
  • On Shakespear and Milton (1818)
    From Essays in back of Eng Comic Writers (#3):
    (1) The Fight**
    (2) Merry England
    (3) Of Persons One Would Wish To Have Seen (Jan.,1826)
    (4) On a Sun-dial (Oct.,1827)
    Lectures on the Literature Eliz. ... (#5):
  • Macbeth
  • Hamlet
  • Henry IV
    From Table Talk (#6):
    1. On The Pleasure of Painting (Dec.,1820)
    4. On the Character of Cobbett (1821)
    7. On the Indian Jugglers
    14. On Landscape of Nicholas Poussin
    16. On Going on a Journey (Jan.,1822)
    21. On Familiar Style (1821)
    From The Spirit of the Age (#9):
  • Elia, and Geoffrey Crayon (1825)
  • Mr. Coleridge (1825)
    From The Plain Speaker (#10):
    III. On the Conversations of Authors (Sep.,1820)
    IV. The Same Subject Continued
    XX. On Reading Old Books (Feb.,1821)
    From Winterslow #(12):
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827)
    From Sketches and Essays (#13):
  • The Letter Bell (Mar.,1831)
  • [TOP]

    #20 William Hazlitt, Selected Writings:
    § Edited and with Introduction by Jon Cook; (Oxford University Press, 1991).
    From The Round Table (#1):
  • On Modern Comedy
  • Why the Arts are not progressive: A Fragment (Jan.,1814)
  • On Gusto (May,1816)
  • Lectures on the English Poets (#2):
  • On Poetry in General (1818)
  • Shakespear
    English Comic Writers (#3):
    (1) The Fight**
    (7) The Main Chance
    (8) Self Love and Benevolence
    Political Essays (#4):
  • What is the People (1817)
  • Illustrations of 'The Times' Newspaper
    Lectures on the Literature Eliz. ... (#5):
  • Macbeth
  • Coriolanus
    From Table Talk (#6):
    7. On the Indian Jugglers
    Life of Napoleon (#11):
  • The French Revolution (1828)
  • ... (An extract)
    From Winterslow (#12):
    I. My first acquaintance with Poets (Apr.1827)
    V. On Public Opinion (1830)
    VI. On Personal Identity
    VII. Mind and Motive
    X. On Consistency of Opinion
    Eloquence of the British Senate:
  • Edmund Burke (also #6,XII;#14)
  • Political Essays:
  • On the Originality of Mr Malthus's Essay
    Characteristics:
  • Characteristics (1823)
  • View of the English Stage:
  • Edmund Kean (Also appears in #20.)
  • The Spirit of the Age (#9):
  • Mr. Wordsworth (1825)
    Which Work??:
  • Modern Tragedy
  • On Fashion (1818) (Also appears in #13.)
  • Our National Theatres (1829) (Also appears in #16.)
  • English Characteristics (1829) (1) (Also appears in #16.)
  • Brummelliana (1828) (Also appears in #16.)
  • Whether the Fine Arts are Promoted by Academics
  • Originality
  • On the Elgin Marbles (Also appears in #9.)
  • [TOP]

    #21 Hazlitt Painted by Himself:
    § By one of Hazlitt's biographers, Catherine Macdonald Maclean. (London, Temple, 1948.)
    1. My Father**
    2. My Childhood at Wem (1787-90)
    3. Adolescence** (1790-93)
    4. Student Days and Mrs. Siddons (1793-95)
    5. Coleridge (1798)
    6. On the Way to Wordsworth (1798)
    7. De L'Amour
    8. The Louvre (1802)
    9. The Pleasure of Painting (1803-05) (This has been compared with that which is set out at #6; same subject with some of the same sentences, but a different essay.)
    10. Reply to Malthus (1807)
    11. My first Visit to Winterslow (1808)
    12. Winterslow (1808-12)
    13. Edmund Kean from View of the English Stage (1814) (Also appears in #19.)
    14. Reaction after Waterloo (1815-20)
    15. Death of my Father (1820)
    16. Sarah (1820-22)
    17. The Louvre from Notes of a Journey through France and Italy (1824)
    18. Human Liberty (1789-1830)

    [TOP]

    Biographies:
  • Wm Hazlitt (1902); by Augustine Birrell (London: MacMillan, 1902).
  • The Life of William Hazlitt (1922); by P. P. Howe; (Penguin, 1949).
  • Born Under Saturn; by Catherine Macdonald Maclean; (London, Collins, 1943).
  • Hazlitt: A Life; by Stanley Jones; (Oxford University Press, 1989).
  • Hazlitt: The Mind of a Critic; by David Bromwich (1951- ); (Oxford University Press, 1991).
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    Peter Landry