A History of Nova Scotia Page


Footnotes To
Book #3, The Road To Being Canada" (1815-1867)
Chapter 12, Education
TOC

FN1 Ch12 With religion comes the "recognition on the part of man of some higher unseen power as having control of his destiny, and as being entitled to obedience, reverence, and worship; the general mental and moral attitude resulting from this belief, with reference to its effect upon the individual or the community; personal or general acceptance of this feeling as a standard of spiritual and practical life." (OED)

FN2 Ch12 The Anglican Church "claimed the same right as it had in England to control public education." James Scotland continued: "The Governor and members of his Council were almost invariably Anglican, and their determination was clear ... to prevent the growth of dissident strongholds." The church achieved its objects through licensing control. ("Education in Old and New Scotland," NSHQ, Vol. 4:4, p. 364.)

FN3 Ch12 "The Schoolhouse in Nova Scotia: A Study of Influences on the Evolution of Schoolhouse Design in Nova Scotia, 1850-1930," NSHR, #14:2, p. 43. The Lancaster system was named after the British educator Joseph Lancaster. It was an educational method that was based on the higher grade students assisting the supervising teacher by passing on what they had learned to other students. The Madras system was named after the British educator Andrew Bell. From what I can see it is a monitorial system not unlike that of the Lancaster system. Bell spent time in India and it was there that he observed the native children in their school, seated on the ground, and writing in the sand. This experience led Bell into the development of his Madras system, one named for the area in which he observed these native children at school.

FN4 Ch12 Thomas Beamish Akins, "History of Halifax City," NSHS, #8, pp. 182-3.

FN5 Ch12 Murdoch, Vol. 3, p. 132.

FN6 Ch12 Moorsom, Letters from Nova Scotia (London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1830), fns @ p. 141.

FN7 Ch12 This census carried out in Nova Scotia in Nova Scotia was done not without difficulty. "Some people refused to give all the necessary data, while others even refused to give any information, fearing that their taxes would be increased." (David E. Stephens, "Census of Nova Scotia: 1861," NSHQ, Vol. #1:2, p. 44.)

FN8 Ch12 Robin H. Wyllie, "The Schoolhouse in Nova Scotia: A Study of Influences on the Evolution of Schoolhouse Design in Nova Scotia, 1850-1930," NSHR, #14:2, p p. 49 & p. 52; see also, "Census of Nova Scotia: 1861," NSHQ, Vol. #1:2.

FN9 Ch12 Revised Statutes of Nova Scotia, as quoted by Judith Ann Evans in "Too Many Cooks Spoil the Broth: School Readers from a Century Ago," NSHR, #2:1, p. 67.

FN10 Ch12 Chas. Bruce Fergusson, "The Inauguration of the Free School System in North Scotia" (Halifax: PANS, Bulletin No. 21, 1964), p. 3."

FN11 Ch12 E. M. Saunders, The Life and Letters of the Right Hon. Sir Charles Tupper (Cassell & Co., 1916), p. 95.

FN12 Ch12 The schools burnt down in 1865, included: New Annon (Colchester County), Havelock (Digby County), Fraser's Mountain (Pictou County) and Ferguson's Cove (Halifax County, 1867). (Robin H. Wyllie, "The Schoolhouse in Nova Scotia: A Study of Influences on the Evolution of Schoolhouse Design in Nova Scotia, 1850-1930," NSHR, #14:2, p. 50.)

FN13 Ch12 Ibid., p. 52.

FN14 Ch12 Ibid., p. 51.

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