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BLUPETE'S HISTORY OF NOVA SCOTIA: 1600-1763.

Transport Ships of the Acadian Deportation: 1755.

Introduction:
On October 27th, 1755, twenty-four transport vessels sailed from Minas Basin. They were under charter parties arranged by
Governor Lawrence. Their cargo: approximately 4500 Acadians which had been forcefully placed aboard by English military, in situ. The home ports of these vessels, for the most part, were to be located in Massachusetts. The captains of these vessels were charged to transport the French inhabitants in Nova Scotia and to deliver them to assigned ports located in the English colonies to the south. This fleet consisted of 14 which originated in the Minas Basin and 10 which had come over from Chignecto. At about the same time, a separate fleet of seven transports containing 1700, or so, had sailed from Annapolis Royal. During December, another five vessels sailed, four from the Minas Basin area, and one, directly from Halifax. These last five, contained approximately 700 deported Acadians. Thus, during the last three months of 1755, some 6800 Acadians were deported out of Nova Scotia. This page deals with the transport ships of the Acadian deportation.1 For a larger history of these events, I refer the reader to "The Deportation of the Acadians."


GO TO >>> A Listing Of The Transports
GO TO >>> Additional Notes On The Transports of the Deportation
GO TO >>> Transports By Departure Points:
Chignecto
Piziquid
Grand Pré
Canard & Habitant
Annapolis Royal
GO TO >>> Transports By Destination Points:
Virginia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Massachusetts
Connecticut
New York
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia

[TOC]

The Transport Description
(tonnage & captain)
From To Times2 No. of Acadian Deportees
Boscawen 95 tons,
David Bigham
Chignecto Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
190
Cornwallis, E.D. 130 tons,
Andrew Sinclair
Chignecto Carolina AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
417
Dolphin Sloop,
80~ tons,
Zebad Forman
Piziquid Annapolis,
Maryland
AA=Oc103
DA=Oc27
AD=No304
EN=Au25-Fe20
230
Dove Sloop,
Samuel Forbes
Minas Basin Connecticut DA=De135 114
Edward Snow,
139 tons,
Ephm. Cooke
Annapolis Royal Connecticut DA=De086
E=Oc09-Ju29
278
Elizabeth Sloop,
95~ tons,
Nathaniel Mulburry
Grand Pré Annapolis,
Maryland
AA=Se04
DA=Oc27
AD=No30
EN=Au20-Mr20
186
Endeavour 83 tons,
John Stone
Canards & Habitant Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Au30
DA=Oc27
166
Endeavor Sloop,
96 tons,
James Nichols
Chignecto South Carolina DA=Oc13 121
Experiment Brig,
136 tons,
Benjamin Stoddard
Annapolis Royal New York DA=De08
E=Oc10-Ma27
200
Hannah Sloop,
70 tons,
Richard Adams
Grand Pré Philadelphia AA=Oc10
AD=De087
E=Au20-De23
140
Helena 166 tons Annapolis Royal Boston,
Massachusetts
DA=De08
323
Hopson Snow,
177 tons,
Edward Whitewood/
James Griffin
Annapolis Royal Carolina DA=De08
E=Oc10-Ap13
342
Industry Sloop,
86 tons,
George Goodwin
Canards & Habitant Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Au30
DA=Oc27
E=Au20-De26
177
Jolly Phillip 94 tons,
Jonathan White
Chignecto Georgia AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
120
Leynord Schooner,
88~ tons,
Thomas Church
Grand Pré Annapolis,
Maryland
AA=Se06
AD=No30
EN=Au20-Fe10
178
Mary Sloop,
90 tons,
Andrew Duning
Canards & Habitant Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Au30
DA=Oc27
E=Au20-De12
182
Neptune Schooner,
95~ tons,
Jonathan Davis/
William Ford
Piziquid Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Au31
DA=Oc27
E=Au20-De17
207
Pembroke Snow,
139 tons
Annapolis Royal Carolina
(hijacked
on route)
DA=De08
232
Prince Fredrick 170 tons,
Wm. Trattles
Chignecto Georgia AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
280
Prosperous Sloop,
75 tons,
Daniel Bragdon
Canards & Habitant Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Oc10
DA=Oc27
E=Au20-Ja21
152
Providence Sloop,
Samuel Barrow
Halifax Carolina - 50
Race Horse Schooner,
John Banks
Minas Basin Boston,
Massachusetts
DA=De208 120
Ranger Sloop,
90 tons,
Francis Peirey
Piziquid Annapolis,
Maryland
DA=Oc27
AD=No30
EN=Au20-Ja30
263
Ranger Schooner,
Nathon Monrow
Minas Basin Williamsburg,
Virginia
DA=De20 112
Sarah & Molly Sloop,
70 tons,
James Purrenton
Grand Pré Williamsburg,
Virginia
AA=Oc10
E=Au29-De12
154
Seaflower Sloop,
81 tons,
Samuel Harris
Grand Pré Boston,
Massachusetts
E=Se29-De01 206
Swallow Brig,
William Hayes
Minas Basin Boston,
Massachusetts
DA=De13
236
Swan Sloop,
82~ tons,
Ephrum Jones/Jonathan Lovett/Haslum
Grand Pré Philadelphia AA=Oc10
AD=De08
E=Au27-De23
168
Three Friends Sloop,
69~ tons,
James Carlyle/Thomas Curtis
Piziquid Philadelphia AA=Oc10
DA=Oc27
AD=De08
E=Au20-De23
156
Two Brothers 161 tons,
James Best
Chignecto Carolina AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
132
Two Sisters Snow,
140 tons
Annapolis Royal Connecticut DA=De08
280
Union 196 tons,
Jonathan Crathorne
Chignecto Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
AA=Au21
DA=Oc13
392

[TOC]

Additional Notes On The Transports of the Deportation:

Boscawen:
Apparently, there was a second Boscawen (63 ton; James Newell, Captain); but she had gone aground at Minas and was never used.
Cornwallis, E.D.:
It is reported that a large number of the Acadians aboard the E.D.Cornwallis had died while on board..
Dolphin:
The information herein complied is on the Dolphin which was one of a group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal, arriving in the Minas Basin on October 10th. It is interesting to note from the account (Apthorp & Hancock) as transmitted for payment that the captain is putting in for an extra, "56 neutrals more [than compliment] of two to a tons, ... per Capt. Murray's direction." Also, as is the case for all of the bills, there are extra charges for food: "To cash pd. for provisions at Maryland, to supply 230 French neutrals, after the provision rec'd of Mr. Saul was expended." Flour, bread, beef, pork, and wood was purchased. Also, interestingly, "Water at Hampton." Further the captain is putting in for 10 shillings "for a protest" and £4 for "two journeys from Lower Marlobo. to Annapolis by Govr's order." The Dolphin was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Dolphin (227) were found to be "sickly occasioned by being too much crowded, 40 lying on deck." Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.9
Dove:
The Dove was one of the four vessel that sailed from Minas Basin on December 13th.
Endeavour:
The Endeavour arrived off the mouth of the Gaspareaux on the 30th of August. The Endeavour carried 166 inhabitants of Rivière-Aux-Canards and Rivière-des-Habitants areas to Williamsburg, Virginia. The Endeavour was one of four transports which went up the Rivière-des-Mines (Cornwallis river these days) and took away 677 persons being the inhabitants of Rivière-Aux-Canards and Rivière-des-Habitants.
The Endeavour was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Endeavour (125) were found to be "healthy but complain of short allowance." Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.
There was a second Endeavor which took 121 deported Acadians from Chignecto to South Carolina. In the later part of August, we see from the records (
NSHS#3, pp. 75-6) where this vessel was one of seven which Governor Lawrence had sent to Colonel Monckton at Chignecto. It seems the seven departed Halifax on August 13th; but, the Endeavor peeled off to enter Minas Basin, arriving there on the 22nd with provisions for Winslow's men at Grand Pré. The other six, I suspect, carried directly on up to the head of the bay to put out their anchors in Beaubassin, soon, thereafter, to be joined by Endeavor after she had delivered supplies to Winslow.
Edward:
Edward was to have 278 deported Acadians, broken down as follows; 41 men, 42 women, 86 sons, 109 daughters. She was supplied but for 28 days; but, we see where she was engaged for eight and half months. She sailed from Annapolis Royal: destination, Connecticut. On Apthrop & Hancock's account there was a deduction for "platforms, water casks, etc." the account was dated September 7th, 1756, and delivered by "John Rowe, attorney to Ephm. Cooke."
Elizabeth:
The Elizabeth arrived at Minas Basin on September 4th and was to carry 186 Acadians from Grand Pré to Annapolis, Maryland. It is noted that the time billed included "10 days allowed for ... return." We see from Winslow's Journal, that, at Chignecto, on August 9th, 35 soldiers (sick and disabled) were put aboard the Elizabeth to be returned to Boston. There is a note on Apthrop & Hancock's account, after claiming for extra provisions (flour, bread, pork) "cash paid necessary for the sick - £11." Also, an all too common note, "To the passage of 52 persons more than the compliment of 2 to a ton." Further, there is an allowance for a "caboose platm. & hds." We find in the OED: A caboose is, "The cook-room or kitchen of merchantmen on deck; a diminutive substitute for the galley of a man-of-war. It is generally furnished with cast-iron apparatus for cooking." Or, a definition dated 1769, "Caboose, a sort of box or house to cover the chimney of some merchant-ships. It somewhat resembles a sentry-box, and generally stands against the barricade on the fore part of the quarter-deck." It seems plain that these vessels were outfitted by the English for their journeys with deck cook houses; platforms for sleeping spaces below; barrels and hogsheads for water; and food provisions for a period of 30 to 40 days, though many of the vessels were obliged to hold on to their human cargo for much longer periods, and, for which, extra billings were rendered.
Experiment:
The Experiment, brig, 136 tons, Benjamin Stoddard. The breakdown of the 200 deported Acadians, as follows: 40 men, 45 women, 56 sons, 59 daughters. The Experiment sailed from Annapolis Royal: destination, New York. There is a note on Apthrop & Hancock's account: "Deduct for supplies recd at St. Chrisr. for platforms & sold here [New York] at vendue, as p. accot. Sales ..." One might speculate that the Experiment (and it would appear there were others traveled all the way down to the Caribbean Islands (Nevis and St. Christopher). It is true that the captain sold off the "platforms" at New York, but that did not necessarily mean that at that point he had any Acadians aboard. It is to be noted that the Experiment was billed from October 10th, 1755, to May 27th, 1756: she was engaged for seven and half months.
Helena:
The Helena was victualed for 28 days. She carried 323, broken down as follows: 52 men, 52 women, 108 sons, 111 daughters. She sailed from Annapolis Royal: destination, Boston.
Hannah:
The Hannah was one of a group of seven transports that were sent up initially to Annapolis Royal, but then ordered over to Minas Basin, arriving at the Gaspareaux on October 10th. She was to carry 140 Acadians to Philadelphia from the Grand Pré area.
Hopson:
The Hopson was the largest of the transports employed. Billed: from Halifax to Annapolis Royal to South Carolina; October 10th to April 13th. It is noted that the time billed included "20 days allowed for the ships return." She was victualed for 42 days. There is a breakdown of the 342 deported Acadians, as follows: 42 men, 46 women, 120 sons, 134 daughters.
Industry:
The Industry arrived off the mouth of the Gaspareau on the 30th of August The Industry was one of four transports which went up the Rivière-des-Mines (Cornwallis river these days) and was to carry 177 inhabitants of Rivière-Aux-Canards and Rivière-des-Habitants areas to Williamsburg, Virginia. [The Industry was a "Monckton Transport," indeed, she was the vessel that brought Col Winslow's company up from Boston at the end of May, 1755.]
Jolly Phillip:
The Jolly Phillip sailed from Chignecto to Georgia with 120 deported Acadians aboard.
Leynord:
The Leynord (sometimes referred to in the records as Leopard) She arrived at Mines Bason on September 6th. She was to carry 178 Acadians from Grand Pré to Annapolis, Maryland.
Mary:
The Mary arrived off the mouth of the Gaspareau on the 30th of August. She was to carry 182 inhabitants of Rivière-Aux-Canards and Rivière-des-Habitants areas to Williamsburg, Virginia. The Mary was one of four transports which went up the Rivière-des-Mines.
Neptune:
The Neptune arrived on August the 31st and went at once to Piziquid. She carried 207 Acadians to Virginia. The Neptune was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Neptune (209) were found to be "healthy but about 40 lie upon the deck." Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.
Pembroke:
The Pembroke sailed from Annapolis Royal: destination, North Carolina. She was victualed for 42 days and of the 232, there was 33 men, 37 women, 70 sons, 92 daughters. There is an interesting story to be told about the Pembroke. Within a short time after leaving Annapolis Royal she was hijacked. She was then brought into the St. John River. Her crew was either overpowered by the Acadian passengers; or, maybe she was caught in a storm and headed into the harbour of St. John; or, maybe she was taken by a privateer. In any event, Boishébert was there and took the distressed Acadians which he found aboard under his wing. This group of Acadians formed a nucleus to which was added others as they boated and trekked north east, all along trying to evade the pursuing English, to eventually arrive at the Miramichi and there to experience a dreadful time of it: exposure to winter weather, starvation and death. In a letter to his fellow governor, Shirley, Lawrence makes reference to what apparently was the Pembroke. At the first of the year, 1756, he had sent a party of rangers in a schooner to the St John ("the men were clothed like French soldiers and the schooner under French colours"): "The Officer found there an English Ship, one of our Transports that sailed from Annapolis Royal with French Inhabitants a Board bound for the Continent, but the Inhabitants had risen upon the Master & Crew and carried the Ship into that Harbour, our people would have brought her off but by an accident they discovered themselves too soon, upon which the French set fire to the Ship." There is an article beginning on the front page of Boston Gazette (March 15, 1756) where it is reported (Halifax: February 25, 1756) that a Captain Milton sailed from Chignecto [sic] with a "cargo of French Neutrals" and how those in command of the ship were overpowered "thro' the Treachery of some of his People, who carried her into St. Mary's Bay, where they lay near a Month, after which they carried her into St. John's, where they burnt the Vessel, and delver'd the People into the Hands of the Indians."
Prince Fredrick:
The Prince Fredrick sailed from Chignecto to Georgia with 280 deported Acadians on board.
Prosperous:
The Prosperous was part of the group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal. She arriving at the Gaspareaux on October 10th. She carried 152 inhabitants of Rivière-Aux-Canards and Rivière-des-Habitants areas to Williamsburg, Virginia.
Providence:
The Providence was chartered by Governor Lawrence at Halifax to deliver the 50 Acadian delegates that he had been kept prisoners since July. The Providence sailed during December for North Carolina.
Race Horse:
The Race Horse sailed on December 20th for Boston.
Ranger:
The Ranger was part of the group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal. She arriving at the Gaspareaux on October 10th. She carried 263 Acadians to Annapolis, Maryland.
The Ranger was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Ranger (205) were found to be "sickly & their water very bad. They wanted an allo'e of rum etc." Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.
It is interesting to note from the account (Apthorp & Hancock) as transmitted for payment included extra charges: "To cash pd. for provisions at Maryland, to supply 208 French persons, after the provisions rec'd from Mr. Saul were expended." The detail shows that what was purchased on arrival at Maryland, was: flour, bread, beef, pork and 3 cords of wood; and, interestingly, "pd. horse hire & expenses to go to the governor when sent for - £4." Further detail, "To the passages of 81 persons more than the complement, of 2 to the ton ..." There was a second Ranger, a Schooner,
with a different captain, Nathon Monrow, which sailed from Minas with 112 on December 20th for Virginia. [There was a Ranger among the "Monckton Transports."]
Sarah & Molly:
The Sarah & Molly was part of the group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal. She arriving at the Gaspareaux on October 10th. She carried from Grand Pré to Williamsburg, Virginia, 154 Acadians. The Sarah & Molly was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Sarah & Molly (151) were found to be "healthy but complain of short allow'e of water." Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.
Seaflower:
The Seaflower was to carry 206 Acadians to Boston and while it sailed from Grand Pré, Gaudet makes the case, that those on the Seaflower came down from Piziquid. The Seaflower had sailed up to Minas during the 1st part of September, from Kittery Point with her owner, Colonel Nathaniel Donnal, aboard. Colonel Donnal had sailed to these waters in order "to receive Some debts formerly Due to him from the Neutral French." It would appear that the Seaflower was pressed into service on the spot; but, no doubt, Colonel Donnal was pleased to get the work on the return trip. ("Chartered by Captain Alexander Murray." As seen on Apthorp & Hancock's account.)
Swallow:
The Swallow sailed for Boston on December 13th with 236 Acadians from Minas Basin.
Swan:
The Swan was part of the group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal. She arrived at the Gaspareau on October 10th. She carried 168 Acadians from Grand Pré to Philadelphia. It is to be noted that the Swan was employed for three and half months.
Three Friends:
The Three Friends was part of the group of seven transports that were ordered up from Annapolis Royal. She arrived at the Gaspareau on October 10th. She was ordered to Fort Edward. She carried 156 Acadians (18 "more than her compliment") to Philadelphia. The Three Friends was one of six transports, that, due to "a furious gale," seeking shelter, put in at Boston. The authorities ordered an enquiry on November 5th (nine days after the vessels had left Minas Basin); this led to on board inspections. Those aboard the Three Friends (160) were found to be "well in general" with 14 days of provisions on board. Certain of the Acadians were taken off (due to sickness I suppose) and the vessels were sent on their way.
Two Brothers:
The Two Brothers sailed from Chignecto to South Carolina with 132 deported Acadians aboard.
Two Sisters:
The Two Sisters carried away 280 Acadians from Annapolis Royal. Aboard were: 42 men, 40 women, 95 sons, 103 daughters. Her destination was Connecticut.
Union:
The Union sailed from Chignecto to Pennsylvania with 392 deported Acadians aboard. It is reported that she was lost at sea.


[TOC]

Transports By Departure Points:

Transports of Chignecto:
Transport No. of Acadians Destination
Union 392 Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Boscawen 190 Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Two Brothers 132 Carolina
E.D.Cornwallis 417 Carolina
Endeavor 121 Carolina
Jolly Phillip 120 Georgia
Prince Fredrick 280 Georgia
1652


[TOC]

Transports of Piziquid:
Transport No. of Acadians Destination
Seaflower 206 Boston,
Massachusetts
Three Friends 156 Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Dolphin 230 Annapolis, Maryland
Ranger 263 Annapolis, Maryland
Neptune 207 Williamsburg,
Virginia
1062


[TOC]

Transports of Grand Pré:
Transport No. of Acadians Destination
Hannah 140 Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Swan 168 Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Elizabeth 186 Annapolis, Maryland
Leopard 178 Annapolis, Maryland
Sarah & Molly 154 Williamsburg,
Virginia
Dove (Dec. 12th) 114 Connecticut
Swallow (Dec. 12th) 236 Boston,
Massachusetts
Race Horse (Dec. 20th) 120 Boston,
Massachusetts
Ranger (Dec. 20th) 112 Williamsburg,
Virginia
1391


[TOC]

Transports of Rivers Canard and Habitant:
Transport No. of Acadians Destination
Mary 182 Williamsburg,
Virginia
Prosperous 152 Williamsburg,
Virginia
Industry 177 Williamsburg,
Virginia
Endeavour 166 Williamsburg,
Virginia
677


[TOC]

Transports of Annapolis Royal:
Transport No. of Acadians Destination
Helena 323 Boston,
Massachusetts
Edward 278 Connecticut
Two Sisters 280 Connecticut
Experiment 200 New York
Pembroke 232 Though bound for North Carolina she was hijacked and put in at St John
Hopson 342 South Carolina
An Unnamed Schooner 9 South Carolina
1664


[TOC]

Transports By Destination Points:

Destination: Williamsburg, Virginia:
(Part, at least, diverted to England)
Transport No. of Acadians From
Neptune 207 Piziquid
Sarah & Molly 154 Grand Pré
Endeavour 166 Canard & Habitant Rivers
Industry 177 Canard & Habitant Rivers
Mary 182 Canard & Habitant Rivers
Prosperous 152 Canard & Habitant Rivers
Ranger 112 Minas Basin
1150


[TOC]

Destination: Annapolis, Maryland:
Transport No. of Acadians From
Ranger 263 Piziquid
Dolphin 230 Piziquid
Elizabeth 186 Grand Pré
Leopard 178 Grand Pré
857


[TOC]

Destination: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Transport No. of Acadians From
Three Friends 156 Piziquid
Swan 168 Grand Pré
Hannah 140 Grand Pré
464


[TOC]

Destination: Boston, Massachusetts
Transport No. of Acadians From
Seaflower 206 Piziquid
Helena 323 Annapolis Royal
Swallow 236 Minas Basin
Race Horse 120 Minas Basin
885


[TOC]

Destination: Connecticut
Transport No. of Acadians From
Edward 278 Annapolis Royal
Two Sisters 280 Annapolis Royal
Dove 114 Minas Basin
672


[TOC]

Destination: New York
Transport No. of Acadians From
Experiment 200 Annapolis Royal


[TOC]

Destination: North Carolina
Transport No. of Acadians From
Providence 50 Halifax


[TOC]

Destination: South Carolina
Transport No. of Acadians From
Hopson 342 Annapolis Royal
Endeavor 121 Chignecto
An Unidentified Schooner 9 Annapolis Royal
472


[TOC]

Destination: Georgia
Transport No. of Acadians From
Jolly Phillip 120 Chignecto
Prince Fredrick 280 Chignecto
400


[UP]

[TOC]

FOOTNOTES:

[1] I am content that I have accounted for most of the transport ships, though, I am sure, there might have been others. Considerable detail about these ships is set forth in (Akins', Selections From The Public Documents (Halifax: Charles Annands, 1869) pp. 285-93. There, will be found copies of the accounts (Apthorp & Hancock) as transmitted for payment for certain of the transports. Also extensive reference is made to the transports by Placide Gaudet (an eminent authority) in his article about the Acadians, which is to be found in the Canadian Archives Report of 1906, vol. II (Ottawa: S.E. Dawson, 1906), pp. viii & on, & Appendix 'E' (p. 81). Winslow, in a letter to Apthorp & Hancock, dated October 23rd, lists the nine vessels from Minas, their names, captains, numbers of Acadians aboard and where bound (NSHS#3, 178). The Annapolis Royal transports, Hopson, Pembroke, et al., were listed by John Knox in his journal, Historical Journal of the Campaigns in North America, which, in the Champlain Society publication, can be found in volume 1, p. 115.

[2] To fit the columns I have abbreviated as follows:
AA=Au30, viz, arrived Acadia;
DA=No30, viz, departed Acadia;
AD=Au30, viz, arrived at her destination; and
E=Au25-Fe20, time engaged or billed out, viz., August 25th, 1755 - February 20th, 1756.

[3] There were seven transports: the Hannah, the Dolphin, the Three Friends, the Ranger, the Swan, the Sarah & Molly, and the Prosperous -- which had sailed up from Annapolis Royal and arrived as a fleet on October 10th. They had gone into Annapolis Royal at an earlier point in order to take the Acadians away from that place. Governor Lawrence thought it better that they go up to Colonel Winslow at the Minas Basin and that he would sent others up from Halifax to carry away the Acadians at Annapolis Royal. (See Gaudet, op cit., p. ix.) I am not sure why there was a need to make the switch, other then it must have been thought it was to be easier to keep the Acadians at fortified Annapolis Royal then those at Minas Basin. At some point six transports (consisting of some of the larger vessels employed in the deportation of 1755) did come into Annapolis Royal, it seems from Halifax: Edward, Experiment, Helena, Hopson, Pembroke, Two Sisters: they all departed on, I believe the same date, December 8th.

[4] On December 4th, 1755, there appeared this news item in The Maryland Gazette: "Sunday last (Nov.30) arrived here the last of the vessels from Nova Scotia ... which make four within this fortnight who have brought upwards of 900 of them." (As quoted by Gaudet, op cit., p. v.)

[5] Menis, December 18th, 1755: From Capt. Phins Osgood to Col Winslow: "I have the pleasure to acquaint you I have shipt off the French inhabitants which you left here, on board the sloop Dove, Samuel Forbes master, 114 for Connecticut. And on board the brigantine, Swallow, William Hayes, master, 236 for Boston. Both which vessels sailed the 13th instant. And have two vessels here preparing to receive the remainder which I hope I shall get ready to sail tomorrow." (NSHS#3, p. 188.)

[6] Captain Adams from Annapolis Royal to John Winslow at Halifax, dated December 8th, 1755: "This morning at 5 the fleet [2 ships, 3 snows & one brigantine] sailed out of the basin with a fair wind."

[7] The Minutes of the Council at Philadelphia, dated December 8th, 1755, show that the captains of the vessels (Three Friends, Swan and Hannah) were given their discharges on that date. (Minutes set out by Gaudet, op cit., p. vi.)

[8] Grand Pré, December 20th, 1755: From Capt. Phins Osgood to Col Winslow: "This serves to inform you that the French which you left under my care are all removed. The last of them sailed this afternoon, in two schooners, viz., the Race Horse, John Banks, master, with 112 persons. Ranger, Nathan Monrow, master, with 112 persons. Banks for Boston. Monrow for Virginia." (NSHS#3, p. 192.)

[9] A number of the transports that were employed to bring the Acadians away from their home lands, had, earlier in the year, been employed to bring Monckton's army (2500 men) up from Boston to attack Fort Beauséjour during June of 1755. For a complete list of the Monckton transports, see NSHS#4, pp. 134-5,185. The Dolphin, the Elizabeth, the Hannah, the Leynord, the Neptune, the Prosperous, the Sarah & Molly, the Swan, the Three Friends are identified as Monckton transports.

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