A blupete Essay

Conclusion (Ch.18), Part 17 to blupete's Essay
"Thoughts On Thoreau And Walden"

Thoreau wraps up his book giving forth with his reflections on life:

"Yet we should oftener look over the tafferel of our craft, like curious passengers, and not make the voyage like stupid sailors picking oakum. ... Explore thyself."
In this, his last chapter, Thoreau peppers us with his various thoughts. For example, what is it that drives a citizen to resolve to obey the laws of the country. In the past it was "honor and religion," no matter that the citizen did not understand the law, or to what purpose it served; honor and religion, -- more common back in Thoreau's days, and rarely these days -- is considered to be the guiding lights of a person's life: what of the little understood laws? Persons, more and more, will bring themselves "in formal opposition" to what are deemed "the most sacred laws of society," and will not be constrained by yet more "sacred" laws.

"It is not for a man to put himself in such an attitude to society, but to maintain himself in whatever attitude he find himself through obedience to the laws of his being, which will never be one of opposition to a just government, if he should chance to meet with such."
Just as he gave his reasons for going to the woods at the first of the book, Thoreau gives his reasons for leaving at the end of his book.

"I left the woods for as good a reason as I went there. Perhaps it seemed to me that I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one. It is remarkable how easily and insensibly we fall into a particular route, and make a beaten track for ourselves. ... how deep the ruts of tradition and conformity!"
Fulfill your dreams:

"I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty, nor weakness weakness. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them."
Come awake and cure yourself of brain rot:

"Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense? The commonest sense is the sense of men asleep, which they express by snoring. ... but in this part of the world it is considered a ground for complaint if a man's writings admit of more than one interpretation. While England endeavors to cure the potato-rot, will not any endeavor to cure the brain-rot, which prevails so much more widely and fatally?"
Follow your own drummer:

"Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such desperate enterprises? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak."
Better an irrelevant truth than any kind of a falsehood:

"No face which we can give to a matter will stead us so well at last as the truth. This alone wears well. For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position. ... Say what you have to say, not what you ought. Any truth is better than make-believe. Tom Hyde, the tinker, standing on the gallows, was asked if he had anything to say. 'Tell the tailors,' said he, 'to remember to make a knot in their thread before they take the first stitch.' His companion's prayer is forgotten."
Never mind wealth, -- live your life:

"However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. ... Love your life, poor as it is. You may perhaps have some pleasant, thrilling, glorious hours, even in a poor-house. ... I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace. The town's poor seem to me often to live the most independent lives of any. ... Cultivate poverty like a garden herb, like sage. Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; return to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want society. If I were confined to a corner of a garret all my days, like a spider, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me. ... [Even if we were to become immensely rich] our aims must still be the same, and our means essentially the same. Moreover, if you are restricted in your range by poverty, if you cannot buy books and newspapers, for instance, you are but confined to the most significant and vital experiences; you are compelled to deal with the material which yields the most sugar and the most starch. It is life near the bone where it is sweetest. ... Superfluous wealth can buy superfluities only."
Never mind your neighbours, -- live your life:

"... My neighbors tell me of their adventures with famous gentlemen and ladies, what notabilities they met at the dinner-table; but I am no more interested in such things than in the contents of the Daily Times. The interest and the conversation are about costume and manners chiefly; but a goose is a goose still, dress it as you will."
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