A blupete Essay

Higher Laws (Ch.11), Part 11 to blupete's Essay
"Thoughts On Thoreau And Walden"

Food is one of the themes pursued by Thoreau in his eleventh chapter.

"I have found repeatedly, of late years, that I cannot fish without falling a little in self-respect. I have tried it again and again. I have skill at it, and, like many of my fellows, a certain instinct for it, which revives from time to time, but always when I have done I feel that it would have been better if I had not fished. ... There is unquestionably this instinct in me which belongs to the lower orders of creation; yet with every year I am less a fisherman, though without more humanity or even wisdom; at present I am no fisherman at all. But I see that if I were to live in a wilderness I should again be tempted to become a fisher and hunter in earnest. ... The practical objection to animal food in my case was its uncleanness [Thoreau was obliged to do his own butchering] ... A little bread or a few potatoes would have done as well, with less trouble and filth. Like many of my contemporaries, I had rarely for many years used animal food, or tea, or coffee, etc.; not so much because of any ill effects which I had traced to them, as because they were not agreeable to my imagination. ... I believe that every man who has ever been earnest to preserve his higher or poetic faculties in the best condition has been particularly inclined to abstain from animal food, and from much food of any kind. ... put an extra condiment into your dish, and it will poison you. It is not worth the while to live by rich cookery. ... Is it not a reproach that man is a carnivorous animal? True, he can and does live, in a great measure, by preying on other animals; but this is a miserable way -- as any one who will go to snaring rabbits, or slaughtering lambs, may learn -- and he will be regarded as a benefactor of his race who shall teach man to confine himself to a more innocent and wholesome diet. Whatever my own practice may be, I have no doubt that it is a part of the destiny of the human race, in its gradual improvement, to leave off eating animals, as surely as the savage tribes have left off eating each other when they came in contact with the more civilized."
Further on, in his chapter on Higher Laws, Thoreau extends his views on food by declaring "that water is the only drink for a wise man ..."

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