A Blupete Biography Page

Raison D'Etre of Government, Part 8 to the Life & Works of
John Locke

And, so, we have the raison d'etre of government as developed by Locke. Professor W. H. Hutt explains:
"In Civil Government Locke expounds the Individualistic view of private property, and again lays down the quintessence of Individualism. 'The great and chief end, therefore, of men's uniting into commonwealths, and putting themselves under government, is the preservation of their property.' He qualifies his theory of a Social Contract, Compact, or Covenant, by pointing out that 'men when they enter into society give up ... liberty of a kind; yet it being only with an intention in every one the better to preserve himself, his liberty and property,' the power conferred 'can never be supposed to extend farther than the common good, but is obliged to secure everyone's property,' etc., etc. This artful qualification of the common good, serves as a complete defence of the 'Glorious Revolution,' which gave us effective parliamentary government."12
I should add that this role of government described by Locke remained pretty well unchallenged until the Fabian Essays of 1889.

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Peter Landry

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2011