A Blupete Biography Page


COLERIDGE QUOTES, A Supplement To
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Elderly Women:-
>"There are three classes of elderly women; first, that dear old soul; second, that old woman; third, that old witch."

Epigram:-
>"What is an epigram? A dwarfish whole,
Its body brevity, and wit its soul. ("An Epigram," 1802.)

History:-
>"Aloof with hermit-eye I scan
The present works of present man
A wild and dreamlike trade of blood and guile,
Too foolish for a tear, too wicked for a smile!"
"Ode to Tranquillity" (1801), st. 4.

Love:-
>"All thoughts, all passions, all delights,
Whatever stirs this mortal frame,
All are but ministers of Love,
And feed his sacred flame." ("Love," 1799.)
>"The man's desire is for the woman; but the woman's desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man." (Table Talk, 1827.)

Luck:-
>"It often amuses me to hear men impute all their misfortunes to fate, luck, or destiny, whilst their successes or good fortune they ascribe to their own sagacity, cleverness or penetration."

Mathematics:-
>An idea, in the highest sense of that word, cannot be conveyed but by a symbol." (Biographia Literaria, 1817.)

Politics:-
>"In politics, what begins in fear usually ends in folly."

Pride:-
>"And the Devil did grin, for his darling sin.
Is pride that apes humility."

Recrimination:-
>"Experience informs us that the first defense of weak minds is to recriminate." (Biographia Literaria, 1817.)

Reform:-
>"Every reform, however necessary, will by weak minds be carried to an excess, that itself will need reforming." (Biographia Literaria, 1817.)

Sailing:-
>"Strongly it bears us along in swelling and limitless billows, Nothing before and nothing behind but the sky and the ocean. ["The Homeric Hexameter" (translated from Schiller) (1799?).]

Sleep:-
>"Oh Sleep! it is a gentle thing,
Beloved from pole to pole,
To Mary Queen the praise be given!
She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven,
That slid into my soul."

Truth:-
>"Veracity does not consist in saying, but in the intention of communicating truth." (Biographia Literaria, 1817.)
>"But whispering tongues can poison truth."

Work:-
>"Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve,
And Hope without an object cannot live." ("Work Without Hope," 1825.)

Writers:-
>"Until you understand a writer's ignorance, presume yourself ignorant of his understanding." (Biographia Literaria, 1817.)
>"The faults of great writers are generally excellencies carried to excess."


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Peter Landry
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2011