A History of Nova Scotia Page


Footnotes To
Book #3, The Road To Being Canada" (1815-1867)
Chapter 20, Pictou And The General Mining Association (G.M.A.)
TOC

FN1 Ch20 Haliburton, vol. 1, p. 314. In their entries (Murdoch and Haliburton) for the year 1825, we see where references are made to a furnace for the smelting of iron ore which had been erected at Clements, in the county of Annapolis. (Murdoch, vol. 3, p. 582-3; Haliburton, vol. 1, p. 309.)

FN2 Ch20 In Britain the smelting of iron had long been known but wood was looked upon as the only fuel that could be used. During the middle of the 18th century a process for smelting iron with coal had been worked out. In the north of England there was plenty of iron ore and, right along side, coal. England's production of iron, the working material of the new age, during the industrial revolution placed her ahead of every other industrial nation. (Green, vol. X, pp. 115-6.)

FN3 Ch20 Letters from Nova Scotia (London: Colburn & Bently, 1830), p. 347.

FN4 Ch20 Explored by H. B. Jefferson in his article, "Mount Rundell, Stellarton, and Albion Railway of 1839," NSHS, #34, pp. 79-120.

FN5 Ch20 Pictou had been known for its coal since, at least, 1798. See Marjory Whitelaw's comment in The Dalhousie Journals (Oberon Press: In 3 vols.: 1978, 1981, & 1982), Vol. 1, p. 207; also see R. D. Evans, "Early Gold Mining in Nova Scotia," NSHS, #34, p. 17.

FN6 Ch20 H. B. Jefferson, "Mount Rundell, Stellarton, and Albion Railway of 1839," NSHS, #34, p. 88.

FN7 Ch20 DCB, "Richard Smith." It was represented that this was the first operating steam engine in Canada, and, maybe it was the first to be used in mining operations; however, in that same year, there was a steam boat, St. John, "running between St. John, Eastport, Digby and Annapolis." (Murdoch, vol. 3, p. 584.)

FN8 Ch20 DCB, "Richard Smith."

FN9 Ch20 Jefferson, "Mount Rundell, Stellarton, and Albion Railway of 1839," NSHS, #34, p. 91. A 'net search discloses that "Mount Rundell" seems now to be called "Mount Rundle", though plainly the place was called after the English family that sponsored the operation, the Rundell family

FN10 Ch20 Joseph Smith paid visits back to England. On one return trip to Nova Scotia he made the trans-Atlantic trip on one of Samuel Cunard's new steam ships, RMS Britannia which came into Halifax Harbour on July 17th, 1840.

FN11 Ch20 Jefferson, "Mount Rundell, Stellarton, and Albion Railway of 1839," NSHS, #34, p. 96.

FN12 Ch20 Samson is still around as a museum piece and can be found at The Museum of Industry at Stellarton. The rails of this first rail road in Nova Scotia have long since been taken up.

FN13 Ch20 Jefferson, "Mount Rundell, Stellarton, and Albion Railway of 1839," NSHS, #34, p. 98.

FN14 Ch20 F. W. Gray, "Pioneer Geologists of Nova Scotia the Men and their Times," NSHS, #26, p. 165.

FN15 Ch20 As quoted by F. W. Gray, "Pioneer Geologists of Nova Scotia the Men and their Times," NSHS, #26, p. 165.

FN16 Ch20 Letters from Nova Scotia (London: Colburn & Bently, 1830) pp. 351-4.

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